All posts filed under: Covid

cuddling a newborn

A checklist for new parents in the pandemic

We are living in strange times and anyone having a baby right now might be feeling isolated and unsure of where to go for support and reassurance. At the end of your pregnancy Ask you midwife what happens when you bring your baby home. Will there be home visits and how many? When will you get to meet/speak to your health visitor? Your health visitor Ask how the postnatal checks will work – are any face-to-face appointments? When will your baby be weighed? Can you contact her if you have any concerns and how do you do this? Weighing Ask your health visitor if your baby can be weighed? Look for the signs that your baby is putting on weight: getting bigger, healthy skin, wet & pooey nappies, alert and settled in-between feeds. If your baby can’t be weighed by your health visitor and you would like some reassurance of weight-gain, you could use some bathroom scales for an indication. You or your partner can stand on the scales – so you know your weight …

pregnancy and coronavirus

Pregnancy and Covid Checklist

This pregnancy and covid checklist is for all pregnant women to help gather the right information for you. Maternity units have experienced tight restrictions as part of the Covid pandemic, which has meant that pregnant woman have been on their own for appointments, induction and on the postnatal ward. Policies are now very varied across the United Kingdom so it is important to ask questions, to find out what options are available to you in your local area. Your antenatal appointments & scans Can your partner come with you? If not, can they be on the phone with you? If you don’t have a partner or your partner isn’t available, find out who you can bring as there may be issues about social bubbles. If you need to use the pregnancy assessment unit during your pregnancy, can someone accompany you? Birth Options Is your maternity unit still offering a home-birth service? If not, what are your options if you want a home-birth? How many birth partners can you have with you? Can you use a …

Coronavirus and pregnancy

Coronavirus and pregnancy is still an important issue. Lockdown might be easing but pregnant women are still classed as clinically vulnerable. If you are in your third trimester, it is advised that you should be attentive to social distancing. Pregnant women are being advised to be cautious because some viral infections, such as the flu, are known to be worse during pregnancy. Although current evidence tells us that the majority of pregnant women who come down with coronavirus will experience only mild/moderate symptoms. Key guidance for pregnant women keep mobile and hydrated stay alert and safe with social distancing and wearing face masks eat well take Folic Acid and Vitamin D supplements attend all of your scans and appointments, unless you are told not to if you are concerned about either yourself or your baby, seek medical assistance If you develop symptomsIf you think you are experiencing symptoms, call 111 for further guidance and let your midwife know. Maternity Unit GuidanceDuring lockdown many units were very strict with policies around homebirth, birth partners and additional …

rcog covid guidance

Pregnancy and Covid

The pregnancy and Covid guidance has been updated by the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RCOG) to include testing for pregnant women. I’m going to put the main points here to ease some of the confusion. Procedures will vary between NHS trusts so ask questions to clarify the situation where you are. Pregnant women are currently categorised as vulnerable. Studies have found that some pregnant women are at an increased risk of serious illness if they have covid. This includes: black, Asian and minority ethnic women women over 35 women who are obese and women with pre-existing conditions such as diabetes and high blood pressure The majority of pregnant women who have been seriously unwell have been in their third trimester. RCOG is emphasising the importance of isolating and social distancing from 28 weeks. Antenatal Appointments RCOG states that women will have 6 face-to-face appointments and scans/tests could be combined with a routine appointment to prevent multiple visits to clinics. Additional appointments can be scheduled in but depending on the individual medical need, these …

coaching

Lockdown: postnatal observations and making memories

I speak to mums with babies most days and this has continued in lockdown – we have had conversations about specific baby issues but sessions inevitably turn to the lockdown and they are doing. The mums with new babies at the start of this were welcome of the chance to hibernate with their partners, to get to know their babies, to work out feeding and find some rhythm on their own without well-meaning advice and comparisons. Now these mums are starting to feel robbed of the maternity leave they were expecting – meeting other mums, seeing other babies, going to groups, being able to ask questions and getting support and reassurance. Not to mention, they are missing out on medical assessments such as getting their baby weighed, although there may be some positives to this. As a postnatal practitioner, baby weight gain is usually a huge topic of conversation because it is closely monitored but during lockdown mums are being guided by their instinct, their baby’s feeding, the number of nappies and how their baby …