All posts filed under: Mother Cuppa – 4th Trimester

maternal mental health

Maternal mental health – here’s why so many new mums can be struggling

Maternal mental health can be summed up by just a few words. These are the words I have heard in many postnatal groups, baby massage sessions and in online conversations when women share how they are doing in those early days and weeks with their new baby. Early motherhood can be simple and calm but it can also be emotional and raw, taking women to unknown depths of insecurity and challenges never experienced before. It’s rarely as simple as just looking after a baby. And here are some of the reasons why maternal mental health can take a bit of a battering… isolation – it’s on you to do it, the responsibility is yours. Any concerns or worries you have may be dismissed and you might feel like you can’t talk about how you feel. guilt – you might question everything you do and guilt can come as part of reflecting on birth, feeding issues, struggles to adapt to life with a baby, not feeling that initial rush of love that you expected. pressure – …

breathing skills in pregnancy

Do you know how to use your breathing?

Knowing how to use your breathing can help to ease any aches and pain, it can give you more energy and it help you to stay calm. By developing simple and effective relaxation and breathing skills, you will also use these techniques in labour, for birth and when your baby is here. Always seek medical support if you are concerned about yourself or your baby. Even if it is just a feeling that something isn’t right. Relax & Breathe runs as a digital course, which can run with 1:1 sessions. You can book a session with me if you have questions, need some additional support or preparation for birth & baby. antenatal & postnatal specialist | working with parents since 2002

resting as a new parent

It is important for new parents to rest

Rest is so important as a new parent – you could be tired/exhausted from birth, you are meeting the needs of a new baby, you will be having broken sleep and it all could be a bit emotional. Rest when you can, nap and snooze, take it in turns with your baby in the early days, ask for help in the later weeks and months when you are tired. There’s no extra reward for powering through and being totally drained – plan for some rest! Book a session with me if you have questions, need some additional support or preparation for birth & baby. antenatal & postnatal specialist | working with parents since 2002 Always seek medical support if you are concerned about yourself or your baby. Even if it is just a feeling that something isn’t right.

new mum comfort

Being comfortable is crucial as a new mum

Feeling comfortable isn’t always easy after you have given birth – you may be sore, you may have stitches, you may be pretty tired. In those early days it can be helpful to rest and sit or lie down, just pottering about and giving yourself chance to heal. Find where is comfortable whether this is in bed or on the sofa where you can use pillows to lean against and to rest your arms on. Going to loo often may help as well, so when you do settle down to rest, snooze or feed you can comfortably stay there for a while. Have water and snacks within reach, as well as your phone and TV remote. Book a session with me if you have questions and need some additional information and reassurance. antenatal & postnatal specialist | working with parents since 2002 Always seek medical support if you are concerned about yourself or your baby. Even if it is just a feeling that something isn’t right.

New Parent Checklist: using your breathing

Having a baby is a time of celebration but it can also be a time of adjustment, with an enormous learning curve. New parents can also experience exhaustion and discomfort, as well as anxiety and feelings of being overwhelmed. Using your breathing is a simple and effective way of feeling calmer and more comfortable and an easier way of settling your baby. The key to using Relax & Breathe is to keep it simple: slow your breathing relax your muscles – your jaw, your shoulders, your hands, your pelvic floor and your legs and feet allow yourself to de-stress and slow down These small steps can mean you and your baby are calmer. A specialist in pregnancy, birth and early parenting