All posts filed under: Janine Smith

A unique range courses and support for expectant and new parents across Tyneside

pregnancy cravings

I have heard that some pregnancy cravings are weird. Is this true?

Pregnancy cravings can be fabulously weird and wonderful and they can be pretty powerful with an over whelming urge to eat whatever it is you desire. It can vary from the healthier foods (fruit) to the not-so-healthy (sweets and fizzy drinks) with a range of odd combinations and non-foods (ice and clay) And you might not crave food at all – it could be all about smells. Here’s a selection of pregnancy cravings in your words… Double Deckers & bread. Nothing with too much flavour thank you very much! Sherbet Dib Dabs – couldn’t get enough of them Baby oranges and Mars Bar ice creams Ice lollies, cakes and sweets Clay Fruit Sponge chewing Pineapple Really cold water and apples Mint Magnums Broccoli and potato waffles Satsumas and cherry tomatoes Beetroot and ice cubes Blood oranges, sour strawberry laces and, erm, the small of rubber tyres in Halfords Capers, olives and anchovies Marmite as a dip for carrot sticks, pickled onions and cheese Chocolate milk and marmite toast Kiwi fruits and Big Macs Coco Pops …

Newcastle University/RVI Research Project – Heparin

A research team at the RVI, led by a Consultant Obstetrician, are investigating providing heparin as a tablet rather than as an injection as this could be a more convenient option for new mums. One of the tablet options, dabigatran, has been used to prevent blood clots in non-pregnant patients. Due to its chemical structure, the researchers suspect that it won’t pass into breastmilk but this needs to be tested to ensure it is a safe option for breastfeeding mums. The research team have encouraging data from 2 non-breastfeeding mothers who took dabigatran and gave breastmilk samples over a 10 hour period. The next step is to extend this work by getting samples from more non-breastfeeding mothers over 24 hours. If successful, this will result in mothers being offered tablets to prevent blood clots instead of injections. The research team would like to talk to a small group of mums to gain feedback and comments about the next step of this research. They would like to discuss… Information on how women value tablets compared to …

hands holding pregnancy test kit

What can the different pregnancy symptoms feel like?

Pregnancy symptoms can vary so much – ranging from powerful to mild and some people don’t experience any symptoms at all. The common symptoms we focus on are sickness and nausea with sore boobs but the signs can be much more subtle than that. For many women it can about ‘just knowing’ or feeling a bit different. Your pregnancy symptoms will be totally unique to you. Here’s pregnancy symptoms in your words Sore boobs! I had Carpal Tunnel Syndrome straight away The first time I was pregnant, I just knew as in I had a feeling – I did a test and there it was. I knew before I did a test and before my period was due. I took a test because the wine I was drinking tasted disgusting! Sore boobs from day one! I didn’t know until I had missed two periods – I thought I was stressed with my new job. And then morning sickness kicked in. I felt hungover for weeks Sense of smell, sore boobs and feeling sick Like a …

breathing as a new parent

5 effective ways to use your breathing as a new parent

Using your breathing as a new parent is about identifying if you are feel anxious, tense or overwhelmed so you can focus on staying calm. Relaxing your body and slowing your breathing can be a simple and effective way to head off any feelings of being overwhelmed as well as to ease any discomfort and to help your recovery from birth. The key to using your breathing as a new parent is to make it familiar for you, so it is comfortable and easy to use and so you don’t have to think about it. So how do you use your breathing as a new parent? You can focus on your breathing if you are experiencing discomfort, pain or you feel overwhelmed. If your breathing is too fast, slow it down again; if you are holding onto tension (forehead, haw, shoulders, hands, pelvic floor, legs, feet) let it go. Throughout the day, slow your breathing and relax your body to feel calmer. Keep it simple – all you are doing is slowing your breathing and …

breathing in labour

5 effective ways to use your breathing in labour

Using your breathing in labour is about listening to your body so you can work with your contractions and identify if you are feeling anxious or overwhelmed so you can focus on staying calm. Relaxing your body and slowing your breathing can be a simple and effective way to head off any panic as well as to stay calm and focused with your contractions. The key to using your breathing in labour is to make it familiar for you, so it is comfortable and easy to use and so you don’t have to think about it. So how do you use your breathing in labour? Focus on your breathing if you are experiencing discomfort, panic or you feel overwhelmed. If you are feeling anxious, panicky or overwhelmed, slowing your breathing will slow your heart-rate, which gets you to be calm and back in control. Keep it simple – all you are doing is slowing your breathing and relaxing your muscles. If you have been practising this in pregnancy it would hopefully be more familiar for …