All posts tagged: new parent checklist

resting as a new parent

It is important for new parents to rest

Rest is so important as a new parent – you could be tired/exhausted from birth, you are meeting the needs of a new baby, you will be having broken sleep and it all could be a bit emotional. Rest when you can, nap and snooze, take it in turns with your baby in the early days, ask for help in the later weeks and months when you are tired. There’s no extra reward for powering through and being totally drained – plan for some rest! Book a session with me if you have questions, need some additional support or preparation for birth & baby. antenatal & postnatal specialist | working with parents since 2002 Always seek medical support if you are concerned about yourself or your baby. Even if it is just a feeling that something isn’t right.

new mum comfort

Being comfortable is crucial as a new mum

Feeling comfortable isn’t always easy after you have given birth – you may be sore, you may have stitches, you may be pretty tired. In those early days it can be helpful to rest and sit or lie down, just pottering about and giving yourself chance to heal. Find where is comfortable whether this is in bed or on the sofa where you can use pillows to lean against and to rest your arms on. Going to loo often may help as well, so when you do settle down to rest, snooze or feed you can comfortably stay there for a while. Have water and snacks within reach, as well as your phone and TV remote. Book a session with me if you have questions and need some additional information and reassurance. antenatal & postnatal specialist | working with parents since 2002 Always seek medical support if you are concerned about yourself or your baby. Even if it is just a feeling that something isn’t right.

New Parent Checklist: using your breathing

Having a baby is a time of celebration but it can also be a time of adjustment, with an enormous learning curve. New parents can also experience exhaustion and discomfort, as well as anxiety and feelings of being overwhelmed. Using your breathing is a simple and effective way of feeling calmer and more comfortable and an easier way of settling your baby. The key to using Relax & Breathe is to keep it simple: slow your breathing relax your muscles – your jaw, your shoulders, your hands, your pelvic floor and your legs and feet allow yourself to de-stress and slow down These small steps can mean you and your baby are calmer. A specialist in pregnancy, birth and early parenting

cuddling a newborn

A checklist for new parents in the pandemic

We are living in strange times and anyone having a baby right now might be feeling isolated and unsure of where to go for support and reassurance. At the end of your pregnancy Ask you midwife what happens when you bring your baby home. Will there be home visits and how many? When will you get to meet/speak to your health visitor? Your health visitor Ask how the postnatal checks will work – are any face-to-face appointments? When will your baby be weighed? Can you contact her if you have any concerns and how do you do this? Weighing Ask your health visitor if your baby can be weighed? Look for the signs that your baby is putting on weight: getting bigger, healthy skin, wet & pooey nappies, alert and settled in-between feeds. If your baby can’t be weighed by your health visitor and you would like some reassurance of weight-gain, you could use some bathroom scales for an indication. You or your partner can stand on the scales – so you know your weight …