All posts filed under: Babyloss

wave of light

Babyloss stories

I asked parents for their babyloss stories – these are raw, real and graphic but this is the reality for many parents so I wanted to share these stories, in parents’ own words… “I was only 18 when I had my angel, I am 37 now. I was unaware of monitoring movements as it wasn’t something the midwives talked about. At 32 weeks I felt ill one day, didn’t think anything of it until that night when I started to get pains, then vomiting so I went to the hospital. I was scanned and told there was no heartbeat. I was taken to a room on my own and sedated. The next day my labour was started and by that night my beautiful, perfect little girl was born sleeping. My mum and my partner were with me. The two midwives I had were amazing, they explained everything they were doing and were so attentive. The hospital were great – my baby was with me in my room and my partner’s parents were able to join …

babyloss awareness

Babyloss Awareness Week 2020

Babyloss makes people uncomfortable – we all saw that recently when Chrissy Teigen & John Legend announced the death of their baby. When a baby dies people don’t know what to say, they can be very afraid of saying the wrong thing but grieving parents shouldn’t be silenced. There’s no right way of grieving – some parents are private with their babyloss and others want to share and talk about their baby, their grief and what they have experienced. My son died in 2007 when he was 3 days old – he had a congenital heart defect and he never made it through his surgery. It was a big ask, it was a big surgery. I can’t put into words the impact that has had on my life. He was my third child and I will forever be grateful to have my girls who kept me going but it is also difficult to balance my absolute love for them and the devastation of losing their brother. They have also felt this loss and my grief, …

cuddling a newborn

Stillbirth and Covid

“At St George‚Äôs, a teaching hospital in south London, stillbirths rose from 2.38 per 1,000 births pre-pandemic, to 9.31 per 1,000 births between Feb 1 and June 14.”The Times, September 30th This is a truly heartbreaking statistic. According to SANDS: Every day in the UK 14 babies die before, during or shortly after birth – and I remember reading about concerns that the stillbirth rate would increase during lockdown. There will be more to learn about why stillbirths increased during this time but, during lockdown, maternity units were more restricted and guidance changed weekly. There was concern among pregnant women about catching Covid, about going into hospital on their own and about having less routine contact with their midwife. In different parenting forums and on social media, expectant mums were discussing whether to miss appointments and scans because they were scared. This pandemic has caused a great deal of additional stress and anxiety and expectant women and their families. And, for some women, they were unable to get to appointments or to the hospital in …

What to say when a baby dies…

Knowing what to say when a baby dies can feel really challenging because people don’t want to get it wrong and they don’t want to cause further upset. Every grieving parent is different so there isn’t an accurate guide on what to do or say when a baby dies. One of the biggest comments can be “I don’t know what to say” – in my experience, be honest and say that, better than saying nothing at all. As a bereaved mother some of the things that helped me are: let parents talk about their baby. If they are talking about their baby, please let them and please do also talk about and mention their baby. Don’t ignore a baby’s existence because that hurts. let parents cry – they need to cry, it helps to release some of the pain. And sometimes they will have no choice, they will have no control over it. Please don’t tell them to shush. please don’t try to make parents feel better – you can’t, their baby is dead. There …

If your baby has just died

If your baby has just died, I am so so sorry. There just aren’t enough words to do this loss justice but I wanted to write something I wish I had been able to read when my newborn son died 13 years ago. Everyone’s experience of loss and grief is different but if this is useful to just one grieving parent, then I’m glad I wrote it. If your baby has just died, there’s every chance you are feeling a combination of numb, shock, denial, anger, exhaustion and pain. The range of feeling can change quickly from hour to hour and its intensity might take your breath away. You might know why your baby died or it could have been completely without any warning, either way you could well be asking yourself why? why you? why your baby? Those early days and weeks can feel like the loneliest place in the world. I remember feeling like I was in a bubble, watching the world continue on as normal around me while mine had been shattered. …