All posts filed under: Let’s Talk About…

coaching

Lockdown: postnatal observations and making memories

I speak to mums with babies most days and this has continued in lockdown – we have had conversations about specific baby issues but sessions inevitably turn to the lockdown and they are doing. The mums with new babies at the start of this were welcome of the chance to hibernate with their partners, to get to know their babies, to work out feeding and find some rhythm on their own without well-meaning advice and comparisons. Now these mums are starting to feel robbed of the maternity leave they were expecting – meeting other mums, seeing other babies, going to groups, being able to ask questions and getting support and reassurance. Not to mention, they are missing out on medical assessments such as getting their baby weighed, although there may be some positives to this. As a postnatal practitioner, baby weight gain is usually a huge topic of conversation because it is closely monitored but during lockdown mums are being guided by their instinct, their baby’s feeding, the number of nappies and how their baby …

Baby massage in lockdown

Running baby massage sessions in a lockdown has been an interesting challenge – this video-phobe has been forced has been forced to just crack on and get on with it! It’s obviously not the same as a friendly gathering of mums and babies, having tea and cake by the fire but it is working as well as it can over video screens. Mums are able to spend time massaging their baby, learning the different massage strokes to settle and soothe their baby at different times of the day. But the sessions are also allowing mums to ‘gather’ together to chat, to share their experiences of parenting in the lockdown and to ask normal questions about all things baby. As a postnatal practitioner, I love running baby massage sessions to provide an informal, comfortable and safe space for mums to offload, share, ask questions, be reassured and make friends. It’s great to see mums find their feet, to get to know their baby, to chat and to relax. Video sessions aren’t quite the same but I …

homebirth

If your homebirth has been cancelled…

With many homebirth services being temporarily suspended across the country, let’s focus on easing your anxiety and getting you better prepared for labour and birth in hospital. As a birth doula, I have supported labouring women at home and in hospital – here are some practical tips which may be helpful for your preparation, for your options and for your mindset. The benefits of a homebirth are that you don’t go anywhere, the midwives come to you so the transition of moving to hospital need to be managed and being at home means you can wander freely at home where you feel more comfortable but this can be managed as well. Many parents want to stay at home for as long as possible before transferring to the maternity unit. This depends on how comfortable you are at home and how safe you feel as you may reach a point during your labour where you want the reassurance of a midwife. It can also help to keep in touch with the maternity unit during early labour …

baby massage

baby sleep and being exhausted

Most days I see mums and babies and the range of sleep – or lack of it – varies so much. Some babies sleep most of the night, others sleep in chunks of a few hours and the rest are up every hour. No two babies are the same and this is why books can be frustrating because your baby might not match their sleep descriptions. The reasons why babies wake frequently can be down to hunger and thirst, needing reassurance, discomfort from wind, reflux or teething or just not knowing how to get themselves back to sleep when they wake up. Sleep can be affected with growth spurts and developmental leaps – which despite apps such as Wonder Weeks – can be unique to your baby. The 2 biggest developmental leaps for your baby are around 4 months and at about 8-10 months (when brain/physical development is happening) when sleep could be at its worst but I have been around enough babies to know that it does vary a great deal. Frequent night-wakings and …

Why a birth debrief matters…

It’s a chance to talk through and make sense of the birth of your baby, which may have been different from your expectations or it may have left you feeling upset or in shock. There is no set time to have a birth debrief session, I see parents at different points after the birth of a baby‚Ķ you might want to talk it through during the first weeks or months when it is fresh in your mind you could be thinking about having another baby but the birth is still weighing on your mind or you might be pregnant again and in need of a debrief before you can prepare properly for birth again. Talking through birth is a huge part of my postnatal sessions, and I work with a lot of parents on a one-to-one basis to talk it through in greater detail. It really helps to be open and honest about how you are feeling, maybe saying things to me that you wouldn’t share with anyone else for fear of worrying them. Birth …